X

Economic Social and Cultural rights

Unfinished BusinessUnfinished Business:Kenya’s efforts to address displacement and land issues in Coast Region

The report analyses displacement in Coast region and identifies tensions over land tenure and poor land governance as key triggers, and obstacles to durable solutions. It provides examples of land issues underlying displacement caused by generalised violence, disasters and human rights violations, and establishes a close link between tenure insecurity and forced evictions. This report also identifies obstacles to durable solutions and opportunities for their achievement, and explores how an efficient and comprehensive response might be put in place.

   

Implementing Free Maternal Health Care in Kenya

On June 1, 2013, the Government of Kenya launched a new policy of free maternity services in all public facilities in order to combat the country’s persistently high maternal morbidity and mortality rates.  This paper explores the challenges facing this policy, including lack of financial resources, insufficient infrastructure, equipment and staffing, poor access to facilities, poor quality of service, and broader causes of maternal mortality.  It then uses evidence from Kenya and other countries to propose strategies for addressing these challenges and ensuring the new policy fully respects, protects, and fulfills women’s reproductive health rights.  It argues that, for the policy to be successful, the government must ensure sufficient and efficient resource allocation, adopt a holistic approach to maternal health, focus on marginalized areas, and ensure comprehensive, human rights based training of all health workers.  It closes with a summary of recommendations to the Government of Kenya and other stakeholders.

download report

Homeless At Home: A Human Rights Assessment of Situation of Internally Displaced Persons in Kenya

This report presents findings of country wide project on monitoring situation of internal displacement in Kenya. The aim of the project was to document the human rights and protection concerns faced by IDPs from April to December 2011. It focused on all categories of displaced persons as well as persons with special needs among them women, children, the elderly and persons with disability. The report also makes appropriate recommendations to ameliorate the situation of IDPs.

download report

 

Reproductive health reportA Report of the Public Inquiry into Violations of Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights in Kenya
The Kenya National Commission on Human Rights in 2011 launched a public inquiry into violations of sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) in Kenya. This was following a complaint filed in 2009 by the Federation of Women Lawyers – Kenya and the Centre for Reproductive Rights – USA alleging systematic violation of women’s reproductive health rights in Kenyan health facilities. The Inquiry aimed to establish the extent and nature of violation of sexual and reproductive health rights and  recommend appropriate redress measures.

download report


Mental State ReportSILENCED MINDS: THE SYSTEMIC NEGLECT OF THE MENTAL HEALTH STATE IN KENYA
In response to a documentary on Kenya’s decaying mental health infrastructure aired by the Cable News Network (CNN) in February 2011, the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) initiated an ‘audit’ of mental health care in Kenya from a human rights perspective, pursuant to its powers under Section 16(1) of the KNCHR Act (2002) and Article 59(2)(f) of the Constitution.
To this end, KNCHR consulted with key stakeholders in the mental health sector, including the Ministry of Medical Services (MOMS), psychiatrists in practice and academia, non-government organisations providing services to people with mental disorders and staff and administrators at a number of mental health facilities around the country, which KNHCR also inspected. This report presents the findings of the Commission’s


Malindi inquiry reportMALINDI INQUIRY:
 REPORT OF A PUBLIC INQUIRY INTO ALLEGATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN MAGARINI, MALINDI
The Kenya National Commission of Human Rights undertook a public inquiry in July 2005 into allegations of human rights violations arising from the activities of salt manufacturing companies in Magarini Division of Malindi District.
Th e Inquiry arose in terms of Section 16(a) of the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights Act 2002 which establishes one of the Commissions functions as “to investigate, on its own initiative or upon complaint made by any person or group of persons, the violations of any human rights”.


Living large reportLIVING LARGE: COUNTING THE COST OF OFFICIAL EXTRAVAGANCE IN KENYA

This report is the first in a series in which the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights and Transparency International Kenya will be highlighting instances of wasteful expenditure in the use of tax-payers funds. The report focuses on the purchase of high-end, luxury vehicles by senior government officials in the fi rst year of the NARC administration. 
It translates the cost of such expenditure into real things that could have been done to alleviate poverty. While the extent of wastage revealed in this report is shocking, information that we have come across during the course of the research suggests that the actual situation is much worse. Unconfirmed reports indicate instances where senior officials have several luxury vehicles at their disposal, in addition to others being allocated to their spouses and children.


Unjust enrichment_lands reportUnjust Enrichment: The Making of land Grabbing Millionaires-The Plunder of Kenya‘s State Corporations and Protected Lands

Illegal and irregular allocations of public land were a common feature of the Moi regime and perhaps it’s most pervasive corrupt practice. The Ndung’u Report as well as various reports of the Public Investment Committee details numerous cases of public land illegal allocated to individuals and companies in total disregard of the law and public interest.
Most allocations were made to politically correct individuals without justiļ¬cation and resulted in individuals being unjustly enriched at great cost to the people of Kenya. Many allottees proceeded to sell the land to state corporations or other parties at colossal amounts of money far in excess of the prevailing market value.
In order to detail the cost and other human rights dimensions of this theft, the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights and the Kenya Land Alliance have partnered to produce this series of publications.

download report


Unjust Enrichment_Lands reportUnjust Enrichment: The Making of land Grabbing Millionaires-The Plunder of Karura, Ngong Road and Kiptagich Forests

Illegal and irregular allocations of public land were a common feature of the Moi regime and perhaps it’s most pervasive corrupt practice. The Ndung’u Report as well as various reports of the Public Investment Committee details numerous cases of public land illegal allocated to individuals and companies in total disregard of the law and public interest.
Most allocations were made to politically correct individuals without justiļ¬cation and resulted in individuals being unjustly enriched at great cost to the people of Kenya. Many allottees proceeded to sell the land to state corporations or other parties at colossal amounts of money far in excess of the prevailing market value.
In order to detail the cost and other human rights dimensions of this theft, the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights and the Kenya Land Alliance have partnered to produce this series of publications.


Human Rights Dimensions of Corruption reportHuman Rights Dimensions of Corruption

Human rights activism has, historically, been centred around civil and political rights while economic, social and cultural rights have generally been viewed as aspirations. Partly arising from this, advocacy on corruption as a human rights issue has not found prominence among human rights organisations despite its many negative effects.
Many African countries have made big gains in civil and political rights as they transition from autocracy to democracy. Corruption threatens this transition irredeemably and it is vital that these gains be safeguarded through vigilance.
The case of Kenya is illustrative of how the return of grand corruption can derail the reform agenda.

download report


Position paper on Ecosoc

POSITION PAPER ON ENHANCING AND OPERATIONALISING ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS IN THE CONSTITUTION OF KENYA , 2006

This Paper presents the Commission’s position on whether and/or the extent to which economic, social and cultural rights may be entrenched in the Bill of Rights in the new Constitution of Kenya; and further, the extent to which the Bill of Rights in the current Constitution can be used to enable Kenyans exercise the essence of economic, social and cultural rights. In explaining its position on these matters, this Paper responds to key arguments, which critics have used to argue for or against the entrenchment of economic, social and cultural rights in the Bill of Rights.

download now


An Identity Crisis? A Study on the Issuance of National Identity Cards In Kenya 

It is the right of every Kenyan attaining 18 years to register and be issued with a National Identity Card (ID). A National Identity Card represents ‘proof’ of Kenyan citizenship without which an individual cannot vote, purchase property, access higher education or even obtain employment; further, those without the document find themselves victims of arrest and extortion by the police on spurious grounds. Needless to say, hindrance to easy access to critical documents like the Identity Card which enhance the enjoyment of rights and freedoms of citizens implies violation of these very rights.

download report


business and human rights

Business and Human rights

We recognize that Business, both big and small, play a crucial role in employment creation, technological and skills transfer, supply of goods and services, and contribute significantly to public revenue through tax payments. This is a crucial role for the development of any country and even more important for a developing country preoccupied with poverty reduction. This role of business has also been recognized by the Government through Kenya Vision 2030 which commits to ensuring that a conducive environment for business is created, maintained and continuously improved; further, the Vision has committed to support the growth of infrastructure for Small-Medium Enterprises given that they are Kenya’s main employment creation sector.

download report 


Electricity as an energy source is essential at both the domestic and commercial levels. The Kenyan government's development blueprint dubbed “Vision 2030" acknowledges that energy is an enabler in promoting national growth. While electricity is not in itself recognized as a right, access to it plays a key role in the realization of other rights. An example is the right to health, which entitles individuals to enjoy quality healthcare services. Access to electricity will enable a dispensary to refrigerate essential drugs and thus contribute to the realization of the right to health. To complement its Third State of Human Rights Report, the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) commissioned the preparation of this booklet focusing on access to electricity in Kenya.

 

Facebook Comments